How alcohol ads are changing the way we consume news

  • September 21, 2021

In the 1980s and 1990s, it was just alcohol advertising.

Today, we are using the same technology to sell adverts to alcohol- and tobacco-related industries.

Now, alcohol ads have become the go-to medium for alcohol-related content.

And, like the tobacco industry, advertisers want to be able to tell you what you are buying, according to research by a University of Warwick researcher.

They also want to know what you think of them.

Dr Paul Johnson, who led the research, says advertisers want more personalised advertising.

“They want a certain kind of response, and they want to give it more context to the content,” he said.

Dr Johnson said he had previously found that people often bought alcohol advertising on a whim.

“It’s almost as if the product itself is the selling point.

And that’s what we’ve found in this study, that’s why it is so powerful,” he explained.

“The advertising is very specific to the consumer.”

Advertisement Dr Johnson says this kind of personalised targeting makes it easier for advertisers to sell alcohol.

“People are looking for a more personal response to their product, which makes it more appealing to them,” he added.

“What you see is that it is almost as though the product is the defining element, not the selling element.”

The research showed that alcohol ads were more likely to appeal to people who were more affluent, who were less likely to be exposed to alcohol, and who had more disposable income.

Advertisement Advertisement Dr Martin said it was also likely that alcohol advertising had a stronger effect on younger people.

“A lot of the ads are targeted to older people and people with lower incomes,” he told Mashable.

“They’re much more targeted to people with disposable incomes.”

Dr Johnson says the study also found that advertising to a younger demographic was more effective than alcohol advertising for younger people and that this could be because younger people were more familiar with the technology.

“The reason that alcohol advertisements are more effective is that they have more specific messages to them, and the more specific the message is, the more likely it is to be understood,” he continued.

“So, people will be more receptive to that message.”

Dr Martin said he hoped the research would help advertisers understand that alcohol-specific ads could be effective for younger audiences, and that they could do it in a way that was more appropriate for their audience.

“I think that advertisers are trying to do this in a more appropriate way than we are currently doing with tobacco,” he concluded.